Transitional Permissions

To complete our three-part series on permissions, which began with Race-Safe Strategies, let’s talk about the transitional nature of reference permissions. When are permissions transitional? When we can safely create a copy of a reference which has a different permission than the reference it copied from. There are several ways in which this can happen, which this diagram summarizes (and the following sections explain): The following sections describe the nature of several one-way transitions that flow downward in the diagram.

Interior References and Shared Mutability

In my last post, Race-safe Strategies, one footnote stated “safety issues which look suspiciously similar to race conditions can crop up when a language supports the creation of “interior references” to shared, mutable values of certain types”. Let’s explore that now. I will begin by recapitulating Manish Goregaokar’s excellent post “The Problem With Single-Threaded Shared Mutable”. His post clearly explains why the Rust language wishes to steer developers towards RefCell for shared references over use of Cell, its inflexible shared, mutable counterpart.

Race-Safe Strategies

I recently made the observation that many people seem unaware of the full collection of constraint mechanisms available for protecting race safety. Someone sensibly asked for a link to an article that provides a modern, comprehensive review. It turns out that the pickings are very slim; the best I could find is this Wikipedia article on thread safety. It’s accurate, but incomplete. To close that gap, let me take a stab here at more comprehensive treatment.