When Sum Types Inherit

Inheritance makes it easier than any other mechanism (e.g. generics, macros, composition/delegation) to define a type that reuses the state and some methods of other types. After reading my inheritance posts, I hope you are convinced that simplifying inheritance to a namespace-based mechanism ensures we obtain this convenient reuse capability, while avoiding most of the complexity and coupling dangers of traditional inheritance. However, you might still wonder whether real-world code needs inheritance’s reuse capability.

Delegated Inheritance

After removing the interface, inversion of control, and protected access capabilities from traditional inheritance, what do we have left (besides composition)? This is what we have: placing a few extra tokens on a derived class causes all named fields and methods of one or more base classes to be absorbed as if explicitly incorporated. Further, certain inherited methods can be customized (overridden) with their own implementation. The primary selling point for inheritance has always been this sort of code reuse.

Disinheriting Abstract Classes

Anti-inheritance advocates are likely to enthusiastically support this post. It promotes the most useful feature of traditional inheritance (Interfaces), turning it into a more valuable abstraction that is largely independent of inheritance. It discards two other traditional features of inheritance, Inversion of Control and Protected Access, as both unnecessary and dangerous. Let’s examine each in turn… Interfaces An interface is “an abstract type that contains no data but defines behaviors as method signatures.

Favor Composition Over Inheritance?

I need to decide what sort of inheritance capability Cone will offer. None! I can hear some of you insist. “Inheritance has recently fallen out of favor as a programming design solution,” claims the Rust language book. “Favor object composition over class inheritance,” recommends the Design Patterns book in 1994. “Inheritance is Evil.” insists Nicolò Pignatelli. It is not hard to find cogent, hard-hitting critiques of inheritance, complaining about costs incurred from fragile base classes, excessive coupling, and broken encapsulation.