Weakening Cycles So That Turing Can Halt

It is notable how often paradoxes arose in the historical journey that led to the Rise of Type Theory. Resolving Russell’s paradox led to his theory of types. Gödel’s Incompleteness theorems rested its proof around a variation of the Liar Paradox. Church and Turing recapitulated this result using their distinctive formalisms. Intuitionistic type theory was deliberately designed to avoid these paradoxes. And so it goes. As an undergraduate, I had the pleasure of studying Gödel’s ingenious proof as part of a course on Predicate Logic.

The Rise of Type Theory

After three dreary posts on syntax, let’s change the pace and pursue an entirely different, deeper and more fun topic! In our community’s #theory channel on Discord, someone asked: “Is there a basis for some of the mathematics related to type theory and its relationship to its usage in programming languages?” This triggered a spirited dialogue about the historical antecedents of type theory, how type theory evolved from that, and the interplay between programming languages and type theory.

2030: Programming Language Trends

When the clock ticks over to a new decade, it is customary to look back, to reflect on how much we have accomplished, and then look forward, to sort out where we want to go. Ten years is long enough that substantive progress should be visible in the glacially-slow evolutionary pace of programming languages. One can see this by noticing how many now-influential languages had no notable marketplace presence only ten years ago: Rust, Go, Swift, Kotlin, Dart, and Julia.